Heather Elder Represents Rethinks the Agency Portfolio.

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Last year, we decided that it was a good time to create an AGENCY PORTFOLIO.  We had a fantastic group of photographers and many opportunities to show it off.  We didn’t want it to be a typical group book that had a section for each photographer.  While we like those and they are always very strong, we wanted ours to be a little different so that it would stand out more at events such as Le Book’s Connections.

What we came up with was a portfolio divided by SPECIALTY instead of by PHOTOGRAPHER.  We liked this idea because it allowed us to showcase the type of work our group can offer while allowing the viewer to file our group away by different specialities.  Of course it is always our main goal for a creative to learn who our photographers are and what they shoot individually.  This will never change.  But, by offering an alternate way for them to view the work in our group, we are opening up another opportunity for them to remember the work.

More often than not the Agency Portfolio is shown in conjunction with the individual portfolios so if a viewer is interested in seeing more, they can choose to do so right then and there.  This is particularly helpful in a setting like Le Book Connections because there are so many books to view and it can get overwhelming for some. We have found that our agency book provides a breath of fresh air in a crowded market.

Take a look for yourself and see.  It is no mistake that we chose the song, Breathe by Sia as the background music.  Enjoy!

Click here to see the video of our Agency Portfolio

Click here to see the video of our Agency Portfolio

When Personal Work Gets Published. Wayfarer Magazine Shares Leigh Beisch’s trip to Italy.

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I always enjoy seeing the personal work that a photographer in our group shares with the world.  While I of course love seeing anything they shoot, I particularly enjoy seeing what Leigh Beisch shares.  This is because she is a food photographer  so when she shares with us something other than food, it is a new insight into her vision.  Seeing the imagery from a recent trip to Italy, it was no surprise to learn that Wayfare Magazine had encouraged her to shoot for them while there. Here is what Leigh had to say about the trip and her imagery.

Here is what Leigh had to say about the trip and her imagery.

“I am excited to see some of my photos from my trip to Rome in the first printed issue of Wayfare Magazine. When I mentioned to a friend and colleague Peggy Wong that I was taking a trip to Rome, she told me that she wanted to see my photos when I returned and that she may want to include them in the first printed edition of Wayfare Magazine (a cool new travel mag that turns that category a bit on it’s head.)

What was nice about this request was that it wasn’t really an assignment. She wanted to see the photos that I would take for myself, she was especially interested in seeing what I shot for my personal series of work entitled “Bodies of Land” which is comprised of out of focus landscapes, or in this case cityscapes.

I also played a lot with Instagram for this trip since I liked the format, the accessibility to capture things at any time and the tones that were rendered with some of the filters. I am usually not a big “effects” photographer, nor do I like a lot of retouching. I liken the filters to using different types of film or printer paper.  ”

Here is the text that accompanies the images in the magazine:

Photographer Leigh Beisch, along with her husband, father, and ten-year-old daughter, forgo their annual trip to Cape Cod for something a little more mysterious. Here we get a light-filled glimpse into the beauty of a region teeming with old world intrigue.

“We decided to rent a small apartment in Trastevere, located on the outskirts of Rome and just south of Vatican City. We booked the apartment for two weeks so we could spend one week as tourists and the next week as locals. While Rome is where scale and extraordinary monuments are on display at every turn, the color and texture of this neighborhood are what captured our hearts. Here we felt like we could experience art, not just see it. The building of our tiny rented apartment had the most amazing rustic front door that was designed to keep out invaders during the medieval period. There was also a stone staircase that was so worn with age that I could imagine a young slave girl carrying water up them thousands of years ago. Staying here instead of a hotel allowed us to let the language of the place—the people, the light, the smells—to seep in and shape our experience. The family and I enjoyed being part of the neighborhood’s everyday routines, sampling from the well-visited osterias and trattorias; shopping at the local designer clothing boutiques; and enjoying the famous Sunday flea market, Porta Portese. One place we frequented was local trattoria La Scala, where my daughter would order her favorite dish of spaghetti con burro e parmigiano, a simple dish of pasta with butter and parmigiano. One of my favorite dishes here was the tagliolini cacio e pepe con fioridi zucca e pachino, a pasta with a beautiful squash blossom layered on top, then sprinkled with parmesan and ground pepper.”

SEE. I spent some time shooting for my personal work  entitled “Bodies of Land,” which is a series of abstract  landscapes that are out of focus with the subject matter being light and color. This allows me to create a more timeless landscape that captures the imagination.

EAT. My father and I woke up early a few mornings to photograph. Before we headed out, we stopped at the local Bar for morning cappuccinos and jam filled pastries. I loved the colorful trays here

Our first morning in Rome, we headed to the Piazza di Santa Maria, where we found a beautiful fountain guarding the entrance to the Basilica of Our Lady, or Basilica di Santa Maria, one of the most ancient churches in Rome. So ancient, in fact, that it’s one of the few churches where you can see Christ depicted as a living prophet, rather than on the cross. It was here that I noticed the light streaming in through the clerestory, illuminating select statues and giving the sense of divine light. This light shaped my experience in Rome, becoming my subject matter and focal point of the trip. The photo of the portal looking out onto the wall with a row of dotted trees was at the entrance to Hadrian’s Villa, a Roman Emperor of the 2nd century AD. The wall pictured here was built to be just one mile long, which was the length of the palace and, according to our guide, the distance that the Emperor’s physician had advised him to walk every day. The morning light of this photo gives us a glimpse into what one of the Emperor’s walks might have been like. From the cobblestone streets and terracotta and maize buildings cast in deep wine hues to street windows dotted with laundry lines, Rome was richer than I had ever imagined. I loved the color of the place, and the way the light would fill ancient crevices to reveal some things and hide others. It felt as though this light held the secrets of Rome.”

To see more of Leigh’s work, please link here.

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Leigh Beisch Resolves to Keep it Simple this Year.

@Leigh Beisch

@Leigh Beisch

Leigh Beisch started off the New Year writing a blog post for her own blog about a particular New Year’s resolution she made.  She was inspired by Nicholas Taleb’s book Antifragile  – Things that Gain from Disorder.  I think she is on the right track for sure.  Here is what she is thinking.

“Steve Jobs said “…You have to work hard to get your thinking clean and make it simple.””

This quote is from a book that I am reading entitled –Antifragile-Things That Gain from Disorder. The author, Nicholas Taleb uses this quote from Jobs as a way of supporting his theory that we need to get back to a more “simple and natural” system, and away from the manufactured, over predicted one that we have. He argues that the more we try to predict things, trying to control their outcome by manufacturing reality, the more fragile we become. And when the unpredictable occurs (and it always does) those systems that are fragile will not survive. He is a proponent of the “Antifragile” as he puts it- a system that doesn’t try to predict, but is prepared to not just survive any shock that comes along (anything from a financial crisis to an earthquake), but actually gains strength from it. He states that Nature is Antifragile- it has weathered so many assaults and shocks and still persists. He proposes to let the simple and natural take their course. I have always been an advocate of the simple and natural. Systematically I use it as part of my personal philosophy and in my business.

So I guess my New Year’s resolution is to stay strong to that conviction. Keep things organic, flowing, simple and natural.”

To read more about what is on Leigh Beisch’s mind, be sure to link to her blog here.

© Leigh Beisch

© Leigh Beisch

Behind the Scenes Video from Leigh Beisch Studio

Everyone loves a behind the scenes video so we thought sharing this one about an October shoot would be fun to share on Halloween.  Leigh Beisch recently posted this on her blog and here is what she had to say about it.  Enjoy!

“Recently we did a Halloween shoot for Delicious Living Magazine, which is a national healthy lifestyle magazine that you can pick up at places like Whole Foods. One of my clients came with her DSLR and shot this video of our shoot behind the scenes. At first I was nervous since I usually hate every photo of me ever taken- I guess that is the bane of being a photographer- being hyper critical of photos that represent you! I love what Erin did- so wanted to share. I was inspired by her gumption- she works full time and has two babies and found the time to learn how to shoot video! She also shot the video in a somewhat reluctant atmosphere- but she persisted and made something fun for her magazine.  She plans to post it on the Delicious Living Magazine Website soon.”

Link here to see video